IAB Europe is shocked by Google’s tracker block

The European advertising and publishing industry is hanging in the curtains over Google’s announcement to no longer allow trackers at all in its Chrome browser.IAB Europe does not say that in so many words, but it is the gist of it this announcement. That neatly positively worded text says that the IAB is talking to Google, also a member of the club. Formal goal: to get clarification about Google’s decision to stop using trackers or identifiers in Chrome, not by third parties but also not by the tech company itself. Informal: Trying to change the tech giant’s mind.

The IAB says: “We believe in a future in which identifiers do not play a role, but also one where identifiers can play a role. As long as the privacy rules are respected and the rights of the consumer are protected. ” The argument goes: “Europe does not prohibit identifiers for the delivery and measurement of digital advertising. The point is that the consumer gets transparency and has choices. ”

The term ‘identifiers’ in this context refers to technical tools that are used to identify and profile digital audiences, users of sites and apps, with the aim of targeting them with personalized advertising.

The European interest group wants to stand up for its supporters in the conversation with Google. This is a multiform group of companies centered around the 65 billion euro spent on advertising on digital channels in 2019. Google’s decision takes a big bite out of that, because it blocks the flow of most of the 23 billion euros (PDF) to programmatic budget. And also in the very short term: in 2022.

A company like Adform, for example, developed an advertising system that, within the framework of the privacy rules, can build visitor profiles for advertising purposes. However, director Jakob Bak states that Google’s decision is not the end of the world. It doesn’t extend beyond Chrome (64 percent market share) and perhaps the Play Store. “Moreover, nothing has changed in a practical sense.”

By the way, IAB Europe is sitting at the table with Google quite late to discuss the matter. Eight months ago, the tech giant already started out publicly, on Github under the name Turtledove, to develop his new conceptual look at the advertising market. Criteo is one of the few parties that recognized this in time and on Github with project Sparrow set out his own course. It took right to speak and now decides effectively.

Incidentally, there is also a camp that is much stricter towards European advertisers and publishers. The civil rights organization Electronic Frontier Foundation is quite clear: “Instead of reinventing the wheel, we need to imagine a world without the tens of thousands of problems of targeted advertising.” In the perception of the influential American organization, there is no situation in which you can monitor the behavior of internet users on the one hand and protect their privacy on the other. FLoC, Google’s alternative advertising system that works purely in the browser, is according to the EFF downright a bad idea.

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