Anthem director leaves BioWare shortly after work on game is halted

A game director is the force behind the creative aspects of a video game. You’re similar to a film director because your vision shapes and defines the game. Together with a team of game designers, you create a road map for the game at large.

Director / director is not a manager in the corporate structure, even if it were a manager, it is still only an employee in a much larger organization, subject to the board of directors, which in turn is subject to shareholders …

And although in theory a manager is responsible for the people who fall under him or her, that does not mean that you have full control over that staff (certainly not in the Netherlands). You will have to make do with the oars you get from above. This can vary from a bunch of bunglers who couldn’t even replace a light bulb together, to a super team who can put together a top product in no time. Usually it is in the middle, sometimes you have outliers up or down.

In the Netherlands, for example, you cannot just fire your staff, there are tough rules attached to it. a collective labor agreement / unions. In the US this can all be a lot easier, but there too you can get a lot of trouble with the unions. I can tell you that it can sometimes take years before you get rid of bad staff through the correct way you got through a legacy organization. Even if you have faster methods of getting rid of bad employees, you need to know how to recruit replacement personnel that have the desired qualities, you need the knowledge to be able to recruit and the budget to be able to offer an attractive position. Otherwise you get “Only monekys work for peanuts!” …

In this case, I wonder if the director is also responsible for the technical aspects of the game, because I think the first complaints were about bugs and not meeting the promised graphics quality. Only later did they arrive with no endgame complaints.

And managers also do not quit their job if they do not have / do not have the tools to perform their job, they also want to make money and will continue to do so for as long as possible, just like the rest of the ‘wage slaves’ within such a company. After all, the staff who worked on Anthem did not collectively stand up and run away because they were not making a good product.

So, yes, there is ultimate responsibility, but practice shows that in general that is not the full problem (if at all). And no, I am not a manager / supervisor, precisely because you become a plaything from below (staff below you) and above (management above you).

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